Eudaimonia (happiness)

Is happiness on the other side of your door?

Is happiness on the other side of your door?


In previous posts I’ve discussed how society accepts average, focuses on the negative and the consequences of this on our lives and happiness. It seems counterintuitive, but we can feel guilty if we’re happy.

For as long as we can remember we’ve been told that happiness follows success and there’s many years of hard work and sacrifice to get there. If we work hard enough, we’ll be successful and only when we’re successful will we be happy.

The reality is that the opposite is true. When we’re happy, and our mindset is positive, we’re more motivated and more resilient, with enhanced problem-solving skills and more functional work oupput. So, of course, we’re more successful.

However, despite evidence to the contrary, we’re told that if we work hard now and make sacrifices now we’ll get a promotion, a better job, pay off our homes quicker and be able to provide for our family. Work hard now and we’ll be successful and therefore happier, in some distant future.

Much of this thinking is a hangover from generations past, where life was a struggle, you accepted ‘your lot’ and deferred happiness was the name of the game. Happiness was a luxury, or the reward of a lifetime of hard work. Perhaps by retirement we may be able to relax and enjoy life.

The most successful people, the ones that enjoy the journey, don’t look at happiness as some distant goal; they capitalise on the positive and enjoy the rewards at every turn. Happiness is the joy we feel in striving to reach our potential. If you have twenty positive interactions in a day and two negative ones, which do you focus on?

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One Response to “Eudaimonia (happiness)”

  1. adamnrave Says:

    I always thought you da mania, WLBB. Nice post. Good advice. Sadly, for me, if I have 20 interactions in a day, I focus on the 30 negative ones … I shall take your advice, then.

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