Archive for June, 2013

A force for good

June 25, 2013
Finding your ki

Finding your ki

You may have heard the term ki. It’s a Japanese word for ‘energy’ or ‘life force’; it’s the natural energy in the Universe that makes up everything. Think about it as positive energy that we can tap into and use in our lives.

You’re already doing it, so it’s nothing too mystical, but actively applying it to your life can create fantastic results. For example, it’s amazing the energy boost you can get from associating with excited and motivated people, being excited by the possibilities of a new project or challenge achieving a major goal.

In Chinese the term is chi and they have a saying that ‘chi follows yi’ where yi is the mind or intention. So logically when you associate with positive people and ‘charge’ your energy you can focus it in the areas that make you feel unstoppable.

If we think of ki or chi energy as a kind of life force then it makes sense that it gives us a feeling of vitality, of wanting to get the most out of life. When we allow this positive energy to combine with the power of the mind, specifically focusing on the good and a positive mindset, then the result is not just a vague happy feeling but directed positivity.

If our thoughts create our reality, or at the very least our perception of that reality, then doesn’t it makes sense that we’re better off when the majority of our thoughts are positive?

Buddha said ‘All that we are is the result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think is what we become’.

Our past doesn’t define our future so we can start with a clean slate. Learn from the past but don’t let it define you. If you’ve made mistakes, failed, given up early, not chased your goals or procrastinated, that doesn’t define who you are now. Likewise past successes don’t guarantee future ones either.

Approach the day with a clear mind, a positive outlook and a sense of wonder that means anything is possible. Find your ki and harness its power for success.

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Happy days … always

June 18, 2013
Sincerely happy, really!

Sincerely happy, really!

I’ve received several text messages today with the familiar, yellow smiley face. Current phones have them right there on the menu page so happiness is just a simple click away.

It’s a common addition to communication but what does it really mean? Does the sender wish me to have a happy day, are they expressing their happiness in talking to me, or is it an empty platitude in a wasteland of social compliance?

When you leave a shop the assistant will often say ‘Have a nice day’, often without even looking up. How many times do we ask ‘How are you?’ when we don’t really listen to the answer, let alone care. How could we care when the answer is often ‘Not too bad thanks’, regardless of what’s actually happening in their life at that moment? What does that mean?

How should I respond in the supermarket when the teenage checkout person asks ‘What’s on for the rest of the day?’ because someone in HR has decided that it’s a friendly and engaging question? ‘Oh, I don’t know, I was thinking about robbing the Tattersalls and going on a drug and alcohol induced frenzy resulting in a police chase along the freeway’. ‘That sounds good, have a nice day, next in line please’.

This kind of smiley ‘have-a-nice-day’ happiness is so ingrained in society that we do and say ‘happy’ things without thinking. We operate on autopilot.

Stimulus – response? Are we, as a society, a modern, happiness centric version of Pavlov’s dog? Are we so vociferously inwardly focused that rote happiness is all we’re capable of?

When I talk about positive energy, ki or chi as I discussed in my last post, I don’t mean this rote kind of ‘happy’. I don’t mean reacting to life’s events with feigned happiness but, rather, trying to increase my potential for happiness and positive experience by increasing my chi, my life force and vitality.

And the more genuine positive energy you give out, the more genuine vitality you will get back.

Now that makes sense; have a happy day!